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Find Web Developers

The Future Of Web Development With HTML-5

August 7th, 2018

HTML-5 is creating ripples across the web design industry and now you have more options than just using Flash. For years Flash has ruled the web design industry however the technology was always cumbersome and industry experts were looking for another alternative. The advent of HTML-5 brought along with it loads of benefits so industry experts predict that HTML-5 will surely stay and will rule the web design industry.

HTML is usually preferred by search engines. The language is available free so you can use them conveniently. It is supported by almost all the browsers and web designers find it effective to be used in web design. The popularity of HTML-5 can be attributed to the features and capabilities of the language. Silver-light and Flash were used earlier but they are not SEO (Search Engine Optimization) friendly however the features integrated into HTML-5 are expected to enhance web visibility among major search engines.

The video and graphics facility in HTML-5 is surely a brilliant addition compared to previous versions of HTML. There are wide ranges of APIs for HTML-5 so it is highly recommended for web design. Web browsers such as Mozilla and Google have also provided the right support to HTML-5 and the next generation applications are benefiting wide number of users. Browsers such as Google Chrome respond well to the video tags and video uploads. Internet Explorer 8 provides extensive support for the latest version of HTML such as Ajax navigation.

In order to use HTML-5, no proprietary plugins are required since the language now has syntactical features. The success of HTML-5 is also due to the fact that it is compatible with older browsers since many web users still find it convenient to use older browsers. The websites created using HTML-5 have enhanced interface and easy to read. Earlier there were compatibility issues for those using flash applications in their website. Designers would find it difficult to make their website compatible with all the browsers but HTML-5 is loaded with features that are browser friendly.

There are also performance related issues while using Flash during the web design. Often using a poor code can lead to the frequent crash of the website and Flash application and the browser also gets locked. This can be very frustrating for a user. Thankfully HTML-5 has looked into the issues to eliminate the problems of Flash.

HTML-5 is simple and easy to use. The element in HTML-5 now has content, header and footer tags. This adds to the convenience of the coder to neatly arrange the code so anyone can understand it. This is also very SEO friendly. Low overhead relates to the animation in HTML-5. Powerful animated content integrated with HTML-5 will surely be enjoyable experience for web designers. Stay tuned for the HTML libraries.

Nowadays the use of internet has extended from desktop to tablets and iPhone. HTML-5 is capable of supporting all the platforms and considerably assists in corresponding web design. This is surely the new age HTML we are referring to.

Economize Your Web Development Effort

August 6th, 2018

If you’ve locked yourself away in a dark room, subsisting on coffee and pizza while you develop the website that’s going to allow your business or idea to revolutionize the world, then stop right now, open the curtains, take a break and read this.

First off, it’s likely that whatever your trying to design or create has already been done in one form or another – even if your application is completely unique, the vast majority of your website will still have attributes that are common to other websites. For example, it may still need to manage users, have an about us page and so on.

Before you write a single line of code, it’s far more valuable to research what can be done with the minimum amount of cost. When I say cost, I actually mean any combination of time, effort, or monetary cost – in other words, the actual cost to you as a person.

What you’ll find is that it’s far more efficient to:

  • start with a well-tested, reliable platform such as a prebuilt website (based on Drupal) to cater for 80% – 100% of what you need
  • research whether any additional functionality you require is already available and can be easily added (remember that prebuilt sites are modular and can easily be extended in this way)
  • lock yourself in a dark room and write the remaining code (or pay someone to do it for you)

Instead of slaving away re-inventing the wheel, you are able to focus specifically on anything that is truly unique, safe in the knowledge that the rest of your prebuilt website is going to do a bang-up job.

Ta-dah…

Before You Call a Web Developer, Ask Yourself One Question

August 5th, 2018

Because we develop Web sites, not surprisingly, the first words we often hear from people are: “I need a Web site.” My response is often “why?” The answer to that question can be quite telling. I can almost guarantee that you won’t end up with a good Web site if you don’t even know why you need one in the first place.

People waste a tremendous amount of time and money on pointless Web sites. The reality is that a Web site should be treated like any other business or marketing expenditure. As with any other advertising medium, you should set goals for your Web site. For example, suppose you sell dog treats. You spend a bunch of money printing a brochure that explains why your dog treats are healthier or tastier than the ones at the grocery store. The goal for that brochure is to give people information on all the fabulous benefits of your special dog treats.

In much the same way, your Web site might explain why your dog treats are great. In fact, it might be nothing more than an “online brochure” with a lot of the same information as the paper one. That’s a reasonable goal for a new site. Since lots of people surfing around online have dogs, later on you may decide that you want to expand your horizons outside of your local area and use the Internet to sell your marvelous dog treats online. In that case, you might need to learn more about ecommerce, merchant accounts, and shopping carts.

As a general rule, people go online to find information, to be entertained, or to buy stuff. If your site lets people do one or more of these things, it has a reason to exist. However, unlike your paper brochure, a Web site has only about four seconds to get your message across (according to a recent report from Akamai and Jupiter Research). If you have no clue what information people are supposed to glean from your Web site, neither will your site visitors. Four seconds later, they’re gone and they probably won’t return.

Your site goals have a lot to do with your business. Many businesses put up Web sites largely for people who are outside of the community and looking for products or services. The most likely visitors to these sites would be tourists and people moving or new to the community, so the information on the site could include frequently asked question (FAQ) pages, pricing, driving directions, and contact information

When setting Web site goals, it makes sense to think about the visitors you are hoping to attract to the site. Who will be reading it? What do they need to know? Why would they visit your site in the first place? What terms would they type into a search engine to find your site? If you don’t have good answers for these questions, you should reconsider the question I asked at the beginning of this article: “Why do you need a Web site?”

Not every business needs a Web site. Many service businesses that rely exclusively on local customers and word of mouth may not. You know your business better than anyone, so before you pick up the phone to call a Web designer, think about what you want your Web site to do for you and why.